Humour Computers & Internet Books

How to Master the Power of the Web: A Book of Revelations

I am a ghost writer.

I died from heart failure, chronic valvular heart disease, and arteriosclerotic heart disease at age 85 in my home in Florida in 2000.

In life, I became a film star from the late 1930s to the 1950s. I appeared in numerous popular feature films, including Algiers (1938), I Take This Woman (1940), Comrade X (1940), Come Live With Me (1941), H.M. Pulham, Esq. (1941), and Samson and Delilah (1949).

I walked away from an unhappy marriage to an Austrian Fascist weapons manufacturer in 1937. In an attempt to stall my acting career, he brought me to his business meetings where I found myself listening to "fat bastards argue antiaircraft this, vacuum tube that."

I realized that by transmitting radio signals along rapidly changing, or "hopping," frequencies, American radio-guided weapons would be far more resilient to detection and jamming. The sequence of frequencies would be known by both the transmitter and receiver ahead of time, but to the German detectors their message would seem like gibberish.

The technology was far ahead of its time. Although my ideas were at first ignored, the technology was later used by the military--during the Cuban missile crisis in October 1962--and more recently employed in wireless technologies like smart phones.

As is the case with many of the famous women inventors, I received very little recognition of my innovative talent at the time; but before my death, I was showered with praise for my groundbreaking invention. In 1997, the Electronic Frontier Foundation honored me with a special Pioneer Award; and I became the first woman to receive the Invention Convention's BULBIE Gnass Spirit of Achievement Bronze Award, ironically the Academy Award of inventing.

Proving I was much more than just another pretty face, I shattered stereotypes and earned a place among the 20th century's most important women inventors. I was truly a visionary whose technological acumen was far ahead of its time.

Fed up with the nonsense tolerated on the World Wide Web, I want to help you master the power of the Web--to increase profits, promote security, and expand your brand!

>>> How to Master the Power of the Web is comprehensive, yet concise.

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You are free to share, copy, or redistribute the materials in this text in any medium or format. You are free to adapt, reuse, modify, transform, or build upon the materials in this text for any purpose whatsoever.

Are You Managing Your Website, Or Is the Web Managing You?: A Book of Revelations

I am a ghost writer.

I died on October 5, 2011, at age 56, of pancreatic cancer--way too young to go.

In life, I was a computing entrepreneur and inventor; and I was the co-founder, chairman, and recognizable face of the world's greatest multinational technology company. I was the man behind the astonishing success of computer animation. I did more to determine what films we watch, how we listen to music, and how we work and play than any other person on the planet.

On my first job interview, I was competing against a Ph.D. in computer science and two candidates with MBAs. I had no academic credentials. But I was hired because I taught myself how to use and program a computer. My first boss told me he hired me because in the computer game, any device or program is obsolete when it first hits the showroom or the Internet. The critical key to computers is the feel that comes from trial and error, curiosity, and play. No institution of higher learning can prepare anyone to succeed in the computer game.

One of the things I've always found is that you've got to start with the customer experience and work backwards to the technology. You can't start with the technology and try to figure out where you are going to try to sell it. I've made this mistake probably more than anybody else, and I've gotten the scar tissue to prove it.

As I have tried to come up with a strategy and a vision for manufacturing computers, I asked, "What incredible benefits can we give to the customer? Where can we take the customer? Not with "Let's sit down with the engineers and figure out what awesome technology we have, and how are we going to market that."

I was described as a control freak and was known to have rejected hundreds of ideas in the quest for my idea of perfection. I frequently apologized for putting a bullet in the head of some things being working on, but I always had a larger vision. I said: "Focusing is about saying no. You've got to say no, no, no ... and the result of that focus is going to be some really great products where the total is much greater than the sum of the parts."

This inspired almost evangelical devotion among techno-geeks. I was the high-priest of the personal computer religion. My public performances were adulatory affairs akin to revivalist rallies. I wore a black turtleneck, jeans, and trainers. I preached the message that salvation lay in my latest gadget. I was the poet of the computer world. I'd gone to India and become a Buddhist. I took LSD and believed it had opened my mind to new ways of thinking.

My story - humble birth, rise and fall, miraculous comeback - was even likened by fanatical fans to the life of Christ.

Open Access Policy

You are free to share, copy, or redistribute the materials in this text in any medium or format. You are free to adapt, reuse, modify, transform, or build upon the materials in this text for any purpose whatsoever.