History Europe Books

The History of London

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

Roman Britain: A History From Beginning to End

Roman BritainThis book takes a holistic look at Roman Britain, from the events leading up to its official inception in AD 43 until the Romans left the Isle entirely around AD 409. The timeline is straightforward, and each chapter delves into some aspect of Romano-British life: dealing with the concept of 'the Celts'; when Britannia actually became 'Roman'; how the two peoples attempted to blend their culture through religion; and lastly, why the Romans had to leave. Inside you will read about...✓ The Timeline✓ Ancient Celtic Ethnicity, A Modern Invention✓ The Beginnings Of Roman Britain✓ Religion And Blending Culture In Roman Britain✓ The Bitter EndIt can be difficult to explain everything from a neutral, unbiased perspective as most of the records from the time are Roman in nature, but drawing on a variety of perspectives from archaeologists and historians alike has made for a thought-provoking assessment of the era. Rome's power bestowed cities like London and York to Britannia, and their lasting influence is still visible today in places like Bath, and at Hadrian's Wall to the north. Roman Britain lingers on still.

The Renaissance: A History from Beginning to End

☆ The Renaissance ☆During the Middle Ages, the nations of Europe forged new identities that moved them away from the lost glory of the Roman Empire into their own ethnicity. The experience of maturation was often clumsy and out of step, an evolutionary process that saw the nation's developing at their own pace as they struggled to replace the protection of Rome with their own home-grown strength. What the nations, once they were ready to be described in that manner, did have was the Roman Catholic Church, which defined itself as the spiritual protector of Christian believers. But the dutiful Christians of the Middle Ages who sought orthodoxy and for the most part obeyed the papal rules underwent a change when the Middle Ages ended. The Renaissance, or rebirth, was a period of time when Europeans began to question what they had been told was sacrosanct. Through art, inventions, science, literature, and theology, the separate nations of the European continent sought answers that the Roman Catholic Church was unwilling, or perhaps unable, to offer. Inside you will read about...✓ The Rebirth of Europe✓ The Italian Renaissance✓ The French Renaissance✓ The Spanish Renaissance✓ The German Renaissance✓ The Low Countries Renaissance✓ The English Renaissance✓ Here Be Dragons: Exploring the UnknownThe Church that had become a powerful political entity was viewed with distrust and skepticism by many Christians; the spread of learning that accompanied the invention of Gutenberg’s printing press meant that bold new ideas were traveling across the boundaries of Europe faster than the Church could silence them. Lascivious, power-brokering popes could not bring a halt to the challenges they encountered when a German priest rebelled against corrupt practices that masqueraded as ecclesiastical authority. As the walls came tumbling down, humanism burst forth, inspiring the art of Michelangelo, the science of Vesalius, the literature of Shakespeare and Cervantes. But with the loss of religious uniformity came terrible conflicts: France suffered the St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre; Spain welcomed the Inquisition to purge heresy; the Low Countries were split between Catholic and Protestant. The Renaissance was a triumph of the human spirit and a confirmation of human ability, even as it affirmed the willingness of men and women to die for the right to think freely.

The History of Britain in 50 Events (Timeline History in 50 Events Book 1)

This book provides an easy to understand overview of British History in 50 Events.Inside you will learn about…- The Foundation of London- The Great Viking Invasion- The Battle of Hastings- The Black Death- The Battle of Waterloo- The Last Public HangingAnd much more!

Winston Churchill: A Captivating Guide to the Life of Winston S. Churchill (Captivating History)

Explore How Churchill Went From Schoolboy Failure to Wartime HeroFree History BONUS Inside!As a British politician who was well known for serving twice as prime minister for the United Kingdom and as an infamous war organizer, leader Winston S. Churchill filled his long life with achievements and recognition plotted throughout every modern history book. Most famously, he led Great Britain into victory over Nazi Germany during World War II in his first run as prime minister and played an essential role in negotiating peace once the war reached an unsteady end. Commonly, his name is associated as one of the “Big Three” alongside United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Soviet Union leader Joseph Stalin. In unity, the three men helped lead the world to a resolution from the violence and terror that reigned in World War II. Winston S. Churchill was more than a military and government leader, though. He lived an entire life full of accomplishments that defined him as a singular person, rather than a government and military leader. In 1953, he won the Nobel Prize for Literature for his “mastery of historical and biographical description as well as for brilliant oratory in defending exalted human values.” Although he maintained a somewhat monotone voice over the radio, Churchill excelled in speaking to live crowds as he imparted encouraging words and recounted tales of his life adventures. On top of these accomplishments as a writer and a trailblazer, Churchill is famous for his endless reserves of energy and his need for little sleep, which allowed him to pursue many projects and hobbies outside of his governmental duties. Among many other possible descriptions, Winton Churchill categorizes as a father, a husband, a painter, a war hero, a politician, a soldier, a smoker, a gambler, and a philosopher.Some of the topics covered in this book include:Churchill’s Personal LifeHis Mental HealthChildhood and Early EducationMilitary ServiceEarly Political Career and World War IThe Wilderness Years and RearmamentWorld War IIPost-World War II and Second TermThe United States and the Soviet UnionAnd much more!Any general biography of Winston S. Churchill will provide an overview of his greatest achievements, but Churchill had other goals and desires that are often ignored and forgotten. What were they? Churchill had a family—a childhood and children of his own—and a political career that began at a young age. He spoke with and entertained some of the biggest names in the world, within both the political and social realms. How did he interact with Franklin D. Roosevelt? With Mahatma Gandhi? Beneath the accolades and accomplishments lies one important question: Who was Winston S. Churchill out of the spotlight? What were his struggles and personal goals? Was he an average man in some ways? The following book is an outline of Winston S. Churchill’s life that not only gives a brief overview of his best-known feats but also provides a glimpse into who he was as a person. Scroll to the top and select the "BUY NOW" button for instant download

Travels in England in 1782

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

The History of Russia in 50 Events: (Russian History - Napoleon In Russia - The Crimean War - Russia In World War - The Cold War) (Timeline History in 50 Events Book 3)

Russia is an assortment of the world’s most beautiful cultures and religions. But how did Russia become home to such a diverse population and tradition that is redolent of so many parts of the world? How much does Russia owe to its spellbinding steppe in respect to its unparalleled history? This book uncovers the mystery behind this and the many other little known facts about Russia. Inside you will learn about...✓ The Invasion of the Mongols✓ The Three False Dmitrys✓ Napoleons Invasion of Russia✓ The Crimean War✓ The Formation of the Soviet Union✓ The Cold WarAnd much more!This eBook discusses 50 thrilling events that were the formative days of the state. It relates both the triumphant and sanguinary years, discussing each epoch in crisp yet sufficient details allowing you to thoroughly discover one of the world’s richest nations.The Kievan Rus’, Mongol invasion, Tsars Rule, Cold War, Soviet Union, the epic February Revolution— this eBook chronicles each epoch, from Prehistoric to modern Russia.

Six Tudor Queens: Writing a New Story

Six Tudor Queens: Writing a New Story is an introduction to the Six Tudor Queens series by eminent historian Alison Weir. The lives of Henry VIII's queens make for dramatic stories that will offer insights into the real lives of the six wives based on extensive research and new theories that will captivate fans of Philippa Gregory and readers who lost their hearts (but not their heads) to the majestic world of Wolf Hall. In all the romancing, has anyone regarded the evidence that Anne Boleyn did not love Henry VIII? Or that Prince Arthur, Katherine of Aragon's first husband, who is said to have loved her in fact cared so little for her that he willed his personal effects to his sister? Or that Henry VIII, an over-protected child and teenager, was prudish when it came to sex? That Jane Seymour, usually portrayed as Henry's one true love, had the makings of a matriarch? There is much to reveal ...

Civilian Lunatic Asylums During the First World War: A Study of Austerity on London's Fringe (Mental Health in Historical Perspective)

This open access book explores the history of asylums and their civilian patients during the First World War, focusing on the effects of wartime austerity and deprivation on the provision of care. While a substantial body of literature on ‘shell shock’ exists, this study uncovers the mental wellbeing of civilians during the war. It provides the first comprehensive account of wartime asylums in London, challenging the commonly held view that changes in psychiatric care for civilians post-war were linked mainly to soldiers’ experiences and treatment. Drawing extensively on archival and published sources, this book examines the impact of medical, scientific, political, cultural and social change on civilian asylums. It compares four asylums in London, each distinct in terms of their priorities and the diversity of their patients. Revealing the histories of the 100,000 civilian patients who were institutionalised during the First World War, this book offers new insights into decision-making and prioritisation of healthcare in times of austerity, and the myriad factors which inform this.