History Australasia & Pacific Books

Children of Arnhem's Kadeidoscope

It was hot. There was sudden stillness in the late afternoon air and the surface of the small waterhole shone with unnatural smoothness. Fresh pig tracks at water's edge suggested pigs just gone. Two bubbles popped to the surface near the edge of the pool; just decaying vegetation, said my mind. I should have smelt crocodile! What is it about the Northern Territory that fascinates? I have only to mention it's name in conversation and people turn to listen. Why, for 180 years, has it drawn people from all over to come, stay longer than they imagined and, often, never leave? This book is a memoir of a family's life in a remote aboriginal community, in Australia's Northern Territory, something the equivalent of remote Canada or Alaska, where few people go. The place Oenpelli, (now Gunbalanya) is near Kadadu National Park, made famous in Crocodile Dundee. It tells of changing world as a missionary family and an aboriginal community become part of modern Australia This our family's story, growing amongst the people, animals and places and colours of this this strange land, alongside an aboriginal community going through its own changes; citizenship, alcohol, uranium mining, land rights, outstation development, and community self management. It is a memoir of growing up in one of the most isolated parts of Australia - in a small aboriginal missionary community in the Northern Territory, something the equivalent of the remote Canada or Alaska. It is the landscape featured in the movie Crocodile Dundee. It tells of the huge change in this place in the last half century with the coming of land rights and aboriginal self determination. It also tells of my mother and fathers lives and Christian beliefs which motivated their contribution to this change. It is a story of my memories and love for this remote and beautiful place, in which I lived as a child then worked as an adult and of many NT characters who gave me the memories.It is also the story of me working as an adult acr

Not Guilty

In 1910 in Bendigo, three children were found dead in their home, brutally murdered with an axe and a knife. Their mother, Camellia McCluskey, was a de facto wife at a time when such a position was not socially acceptable. Her partner, George, was considerably older than her. The two lived together happily for a few years before the relationship deteriorated, putting in place a chain of events that finally resulted in the slaying of Dorothy, Eric and Ida. 'Not Guilty' tells the story of those events, and the court proceedings that followed them. A storm of newspaper coverage surrounded Camellia as the Australian media struggled to understand the motivations that led her down the path she took. This story is based on Camellia's letters, court records, newspaper coverage, and other historical documents.

An Historical Geography of Tourism in Victoria, Australia: Case Studies

This work is concerned with the emergence of tourism in colonial Victoria, Australia, and is part of ongoing research into understanding the 'tourism era of discovery'. It deals with the processes of opening up new attractions and its focus is the embryonic or emergent phase in which natural attractions become the subject of tourist visitation. It is contextualized in the study of eight tourism sites that are the primary focus of this work.