Biography Medical, Legal & Social Sciences Books

A Terrible Secret: Part 1 of 3: The next gripping story from bestselling author, Cathy Glass

PART 1 OF 3Tilly hates her stepfather, Dave. He abuses her mother, but she refuses to leave him.Frightened for her own safety, Tilly asks to go into foster care and is placed with Cathy. Tilly arrives with a graze on her cheek and Cathy becomes increasingly concerned by Dave’s behaviour, especially when she learns he has been showering Tilly with gifts. While she’s busy looking after Tilly and trying to keep her safe, Cathy is also worried about her own daughter, Lucy. She has a very difficult decision to make that will affect the rest of her life, and Cathy hopes she makes the right choice.

Do you Dare?

Michelle has always wondered what it would be like to sleep with another woman, but has been too shy to suggest it to her boyfriends. But when Michelle's new man starts talking dirty to her, she can't resist suggesting they turn their fantasy into reality. But how will her dreams of a threesome translate when played out in stark reality?This special free ebook, by international sex expert Tracey Cox, is just one example of what women dream about - and what happens when they dare to take what existed perfectly in their heads into the reality of their beds. Michelle's fantasy is written in three parts:The fantasy - what she imagined the encounter would beThe decision - the switch to reality to find out why she decided to act out her fantasyThe reality - what actually happened in real life

The Woman Who Lost Her Face: How Charla Nash Survived the World's Most Infamous Chimpanzee Attack

"Through Charla I have learned that the will to survive is a powerful force and that human courage knows no bounds." --NBC's Meredith VieiraViciously attacked by a chimpanzee in 2009, Charla Nash was left so severely disfigured that she no longer had eyes to see the world, hands to feel it or even a face to show it. By her own doctors' accounts, she never should have survived her injuries.Charla's story is one of incredible strength, fierce determination and cutting-edge medicine. NBC News and Meredith Vieira have been covering the story since the life-altering attack, documenting Charla's unfaltering spirit and the remarkable surgeries that not only kept her alive, but gave her a new face and, ultimately, restored her very humanity.Featuring candid and exclusive interviews with Charla, her family, her doctors and the chimpanzee's owner, The Woman Who Lost Her Face is an intimate look at Charla's life before and after the attack. This in-depth account takes you inside the operating rooms and hospitals where medical history was made and includes new details about the chimpanzee who mauled Charla to the brink of death and the woman who raised the animal as her son. The Woman Who Lost Her Face also features never-before-seen images of Charla and insight from the NBC News producers and reporters who covered the story.

Trapped: Part 1 of 3

Trapped can either be read as a full-length eBook or in 3 serialised eBook-only parts.

This is PART 1 of 3 (Chapters 1-10 of 35).

You can read Part 1 two weeks ahead of release of the full-length eBook and paperback.

Phoebe, an autistic nine-year-old girl, is taken into police protection after a chance comment to one of her teachers alerts the authorities that all might not be what it seems in her comfortable, middle-class home. Experienced foster carer Rosie accepts the youngster as an emergency placement knowing that her autism will represent a challenge - not only for her but also for the rest of the family.

But after several shocking incidents of self-harming, Pica and threats to kill, it soon becomes apparent that Phoebe's autism may be the least of her problems.

Locked for nine years in a secret world of severe abuse, as Phoebe opens up about her horrific past, her foster carer begins to suspect that Phoebe may not be suffering from autism at all.

Joyce: The Return of the Repressed (Contestations)

Did James Joyce, that icon of modernity, spearhead the dismantling of the Cartesian subject? Or was he a supreme example of a modern man forever divided and never fully known to himself? This volume reads the dialogue of contradictory cultural voices in Joyce’s works—revolutionary and reactionary, critical and subject to critique, marginal and central. It includes ten essays that identify repressed elements in Joyce’s writings and examine how psychic and cultural repressions persistently surface in his texts. Contributors include Joseph A. Boone, Marilyn L. Brownstein, Jay Clayton, Laura Doyle, Susan Stanford Friedman, Christine Froula, Ellen Carol Jones, Alberto Moreirias, Richard Pearce, and Robert Spoo.

Franz Kafka: The Necessity of Form

In Stanley Corngold’s view, the themes and strategies of Kafka’s fiction are generated by a tension between his concern for writing and his growing sense of its arbitrary character. Analyzing Kafka’s work in light of "the necessity of form," which is also a merely formal necessity, Corngold uncovers the fundamental paradox of Kafka’s art and life. The first section of the book shows how Kafka’s rhetoric may be understood as the daring project of a man compelled to live his life as literature. In the central part of the book, Corngold reflects on the place of Kafka within the modern tradition, discussing such influential precursors of Cervantes, Flaubert, and Nietzsche, whose works display a comparable narrative disruption. Kafka’s distinctive narrative strategies, Corngold points out, demand interpretation at the same time they resist it. Critics of Kafka, he says, must be aware that their approaches are guided by the principles that Kafka’s fiction identifies, dramatizes, and rejects.

Auguste Comte (Key Sociologists)

Auguste Comte is widely acknowledged as the founder of the science of sociology and the 'Religion of Humanity'. In this fascinating study, the first major reassessment of Comte’s sociology for many years, Mike Gane draws on recent scholarship and presents a new reading of this remarkable figure. Comte’s contributions to the history and philosophy of science have decisively influenced positive methodologies. He coined the term ‘sociology’ and gave it its first content, and he is renowned for having introduced the sociology of gender and emotion into sociology. What is less well known however, is that Comte contributed to ethics, and indeed coined the word ‘altruism’.  In this important work Gane examines Comte's sociological vision and shows that, because he thought sociology could and should be reflexive, encyclopaedic and utopian, he considered topics such as fetishism, polytheism, fate, love, and the relations between sociology, science, theology and culture.This fascinating account of the birth of sociology is an unprecedented introductory text on Comte. Gane’s work is an essential read for all sociologists and students of the discipline.

Tanna Times: Islanders in the World

Anthropologists like to tell other people’s stories but local experts tell them even better.This book introduces the vibrant living culture and fascinating history of Tanna, an island in Vanuatu, Melanesia, through the stories of a dozen interconnected Tanna Islanders. Tracing the past 250 years of island experiences that cross the globe, each of these distinctly extraordinary lives tells larger human narratives of cultural continuity and change. In following Tanna’s times, we find that all of us, even those living on seemingly out-of-the-way Pacific Islands, are firmly linked into the world’s networks. Each chapter opens with a telling life story then contextualizes that biography with pertinent ethnographic explanation and archival research. Since 1774, Tanna Islanders have participated in events that have captured global anthropological and popular attention. These include receiving British explorer James Cook; a nineteenth-century voyage to London; troubled relations with early Christian missionaries; overseas emigration for plantation labor; the innovation of the John Frum Movement, a so-called Melanesian “cargo cult”; service in American military labor corps during the Pacific War; agitation in the 1970s for an independent Vanuatu; urban migration to seek work in Port Vila (Vanuatu’s capital); the international kava business; juggling arranged versus love marriages; and modern dealings with social media and swelling numbers of tourists. Yet, partly as a consequence of their experience abroad, Islanders fiercely protect their cultural identity and continue to maintain resilient bonds with their Tanna homes. Drawing on forty years of fieldwork in Vanuatu, author Lamont Lindstrom offers rich insights into the culture of Tanna. His close relationship with the island’s people is reflected in his choice to feature their voices; he celebrates and recounts their stories here in accessible, engaging prose. An ethnographic case study written for students of anthropology, the author has included a concise list of key sources and essential further readings suggestions at the end of each chapter. Tanna Times complements classroom and scholarly interests in kinship and marriage, economics, politics, religion, history, linguistics, gender and personhood, and social transformation in Melanesia and beyond.

Creativity/Anthropology (The Anthropology of Contemporary Issues)

Creativity and play erupt in the most solemn of everyday worlds as individuals reshape traditional forms in the light of changing historical circumstances. In this lively volume, fourteen distinguished anthropologists explore the life of creativity in social life across the globe and within the study of ethnography itself. Contributors include Barbara A. Babcock, Edward M. Bruner, James W. Fernandez, Don Handelman, Smadar Lavie, José E. Limon, Barbara Myerhoff, Kirin Narayan, Renato Rosaldo, Richard Schechner, Edward L. Schieffelin, Marjorie Shostak, Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing, and Edith Turner.

The Anxiety of Freedom: Imagination and Individuality in Locke's Political Thought

The enduring appeal of liberalism lies in its commitment to the idea that human beings have a "natural" potential to live as free and equal individuals. The realization of this potential, however, is not a matter of nature, but requires that people be molded by a complex constellation of political and educational institutions. In this eloquent and provocative book, Uday Singh Mehta investigates in the major writings of John Locke the implications of this tension between individuals and the institutions that mold them. The process of molding, he demonstrates, involves an external conformity and an internal self-restraint that severely limit the scope of individuality.Mehta explores the centrality of the human imagination in Locke’s thought, focusing on his obsession with the potential dangers of the cognitive realm. Underlying Locke’s fears regarding the excesses of the imagination is a political anxiety concerning how to limit their potential effects. In light of Locke’s views on education, Mehta concludes that the promise of liberation at the heart of liberalism is vitiated by its constraints on cognitive and political freedom.

Innovative School Principals and Restructuring: Life History Portraits of Successful Managers of Change (Educational Management Series)

Restructuring is an international phenomenon, and great stress is placed on the role of the innovative principal in the process. This book offers insights into the ways in which six principals go about leading the change process in their schools, and looks for ways of understanding why and how principals behave and think in the way they do. Its edited topical life history approach identifies key events, experiences and significant others in the lives of the case study managers, and shows how these have shaped the way they implement changes to curriculum, teaching and learning in their schools.

Transfigured World: Walter Pater's Aesthetic Historicism

Exploring the intricacy and complexity of Walter Pater’s prose, Transfigured World challenges traditional approaches to Pater and shows precise ways in which the form of his prose expresses its content. Carolyn Williams asserts that Pater’s aestheticism and his historicism should be understood as dialectically interrelated critical strategies, inextricable from each other in practice. Williams discusses the explicit and embedded narratives that play a crucial role in Pater’s aesthetic criticism and examines the figures that compose these narratives, including rhetorical tropes, structures of argument such as genealogy, and historical or fictional personae.

Critical Miscellanies (Vol. 3 of 3) Essay 10: Auguste Comte

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BUKOWSKI LITE; Stories of Lust, Life and Love

When I heard Charles Bukowski’s poem “There is a Bluebird in My Heart” I immediately asked; “There are two of me?” But when I delved into Bukowski’s books I knew he was probably more authentic than I, possibly more perverted than I and definately better published than I.Yet he and I were, for some periods of our lives, living on the same plane; which appears to be baser than most people are willing to admit.Somehow, between the two of us, we dredged up a bit of humanity which we attempted to hide. I believe he did a better job of hiding it than I did.So this book is really a heavy version of my experiences and a light version of the life that Bukowski lived.As the cover states, there a stories of lust, life and love; all of it true and hardly embellished.