History Middle East Books

Imperial Genus (Asia Pacific Modern)

A free ebook version of this title is available through Luminos, University of California Press' open access publishing program for monographs. Imperial Genus begins with the turn to world culture and ideas of the generally human in Japan's cultural policy in Korea in 1919. How were concepts of the human's genus-being operative in the discourses of the Japanese empire? How did they inform the imagination and representation of modernity in colonial Korea? Travis Workman delves into these questions through texts in philosophy, literature, and social science. Imperial Genus focuses on how notions of human generality mediated uncertainty between the transcendental and the empirical, the universal and the particular, and empire and colony. It shows how cosmopolitan cultural principles, the proletarian arts, and Pan-Asian imperial nationalism converged with practices of colonial governmentality. It is a genealogy of the various articulations of the human's genus-being within modern humanist thinking in East Asia, as well as an exploration of the limits of the human as both concept and historical figure.

Flight From Syria: Refugee Stories

Flight from Syria: Refugee Stories features the writing and photography of nine Pulitzer Center grantees- journalists who reported on Syrian refugees between 2012 and 2015. Their travels took them from Syria to Sweden, and from crowded camps to cramped apartments in city suburbs. Each of the journalists- Hugh Eakin, Lauren Gelfond Feldinger, Stephen Franklin, Joanna Kakissis, Alia Malek, Holly Pickett, Alisa Roth, Alice Su, and Selin Thomas- lends a unique perspective. Originally published in Al Jazeera, BBC News, Guernica, In These Times, Marketplace, NPR, The Atlantic and The New York Review of Books, these stories tell of an abandoned homeland, an indifferent world, and an uncertain future. They trace the history of one of the biggest displacements of modern times- providing a testament to the suffering and courage of those who fled.

Edited by Kem Knapp Sawyer

Designed by Evey Wilson

Crisis in the Arab World

The events of January and February 2011 have shaken not only the Middle East and North Africa but the whole world.

Starting in Tunisia in December 2010, unrest has spiralled through the Arab world, with extraordinary results: following mass uprisings, the Tunisian dictator Zine al-Abidine Ben-Ali has fled the country, while his counterpart Hosni Mubarak of Egypt decided to stand down with immediate effect. Meanwhile, Algeria - also ruled by a military dictatorship - has seen major riots, with several protestors killed, while similar demonstrations in Yemen have led President Saleh to announce that he will not seek another term in office.

Crisis in the Arab World is a free sampler of Yale books that discuss these three febrile regions.

The Doctor,The Eye Doctor and Me: Analogies and Parallels Between The World of Doctor Who and the Syrian Conflict

"Never cruel or cowardly. Never give up, never give in" - The Doctor's Promise

"Assad or we burn the country" - The Eye Doctor's Promise

The Doctor, the lead character in the BBC's phenomenally successful TV show "Doctor Who"; a time-traveling alien hundreds of years old. A compassionate person with the curiosity of a child and the wisdom of the ages.

The Eye Doctor, Bashar Assad of Syria, whose ophthalmology studies in the UK were interrupted to enable him to inherit the presidency of a country from his father.

"The Doctor, the Eye Doctor and Me" is the world of Doctor Who and the Syrian conflict as seen through the eyes of Aboud Dandachi, an activist and refugee from the city of Homs. The book attempts to explain the events of the Syrian conflict by exploring the remarkable analogies, parallels and contrasts between the war and the adventures of the Eleventh Doctor. Among the thirteen episodes the book draws on include;

The Impossible Astronaut/The Day of the Moon, the day the Doctor fought his own revolution.

The Doctor's Wife, the day the Doctor lost his home and himself became a displaced person.

A Good Man Goes to War, as opposed to how a "bad man" implements "reforms".

Journey to the Center of the TARDIS, when the Doctor proved truly capable of Machiavellian manipulations that would put dictators to shame.

Asylum of the Daleks, and the narratives individuals create and live by in order to endure the burdens of war.

The Night of the Doctor, what happens when both sides in a conflict become as bad as the other.

The Time of the Doctor, the most important factor and lesson in war, any war, as exemplified by the Doctor's hundreds year battle to protect one town from the combined forces of the universe.

The book also examines the contrasting languages used by the Doctor and the Eye Doctor, and how the year 2013 was a milestone for both Doctor Who and Syria's political history.

Written by Aboud Dandachi, a Syrian activist who over the course of the war would live in both opposition and loyalist areas, and witness first hand the effects of the conflict on both communities, "The Doctor, the Eye Doctor and Me" is a unique interpretation of Doctor Who as it marked its fiftieth anniversary, and a first-hand account of the most devastating period in Syria's modern history.

It is both the story of one person's journey through the different stages of the Syrian conflict, and the lessons and insights into the meaning of the events of that journey as gleaned from parallels and analogies with one of the century's most remarkable cultural achievements.