History Americas Books

The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers is a collection of 85 articles and essays written and published anonymously in 1787 and 1788 by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay exhorting voters to ratify the United States Constitution. The controversial arguments first presented here by three of America's greatest patriots and political theorists are still hotly debated today.

This new digital edition of The Federalist Papers includes a table of contents and an image gallery.

Andrew Jackson: A Life From Beginning to End (One Hour History US Presidents Book 6)

Andrew Jackson

Old Hickory. King Mob. The Peoples President. King Andrew I. The nicknames by which the seventh president is known reflect the different facets of his complicated nature. He believed in the rights of the common man because he came from humble beginnings and distrusted the vested institutions of power. The first American president born to immigrant parents, Jackson was the embodiment of the new blood which infused the American spirit in the early 19th century.

Inside you will read about...

? The Birth of a Legend

? Jackson the General

? Jackson and Politics

? Jackson's Home Life

? Jackson's First Term

? Jackson's Second Term

? Jackson Returns to Tennessee

? Jackson's Legacy

Like his country, he was both ruthless and chivalrous, hot-tempered and steadfast, an authoritarian and a believer in equality. Jackson cannot be described in one-dimensional terms because there were layers to the Tennessee frontier president. Jacksonian democracy invigorated the national government and became a foundation of the modern political process. Controversial and complicated, Andrew Jacksons life is worthy of examination. To understand America, it's vital to understand Andrew Jackson."

Common Sense

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

Up From Slavery

My Bondage and My Freedom

My Bondage and My Freedom is an autobiographical slave narrative written by Frederick Douglass and published in 1855. It is the second of three autobiographies written by Douglass, and is mainly an expansion of his first (Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass), discussing in greater detail his transition from bondage to liberty. Following this liberation, Douglass, a former slave, went on to become a prominent abolitionist, speaker, author, and publisher. In his foreword to the 2003 Modern Library paperback edition, John Stauffer writes: "My Bondage and My Freedom," [is] a deep meditation on the meaning of slavery, race, and freedom, and on the power of faith and literacy, as well as a portrait of an individual and a nation a few years before the Civil War. As his narrative unfolds, Frederick Douglass-abolitionist, journalist, orator, and one of the most powerful voices to emerge from the American civil rights movement-transforms himself from slave to fugitive to reformer, leaving behind a legacy of social, intellectual, and political thought. The 1855 text includes Douglass's original Appendix, composed of excerpts from the author's speeches as well as a letter he wrote to his former master.

Indian Boyhood