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Little Women (AmazonClassics Edition)

As a New England mother struggles to support her family in the wake of her husband's service in the Civil War, her four daughters struggle, too--caught between childhood dreams and the realities of burgeoning adulthood. For Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March, raised in integrity and virtue, negotiating the right path in life means making choices that will either narrow or expand their destinies.

Based on the author's life, Little Women transcends genre, gender, and class with its examination of personal quests, societal restrictions, family ties, and the end of innocence.

AmazonClassics brings you timeless works from the masters of storytelling. Ideal for anyone who wants to read a great work for the first time or rediscover an old favorite, these new editions open the door to literature's most unforgettable characters and beloved worlds.

Revised edition: Previously published as Little Women, this edition of Little Women (AmazonClassics Edition) includes editorial revisions.

The Greatest Ghost and Horror Stories Ever Written: volume 3 (30 short stories)

If you were looking for the Holy Bible of the horror anthologies, consider yourself lucky, because you just found it!

Cosmic horror, supernatural events, ghost stories, weird fiction, mystical fantasies, occult narratives, this book plunges you into dark domains and brings you face to face with surreal monstrosities.

This third volume of "The Greatest Ghost and Horror Stories Ever Written" features 30 stories by an all-star cast, including Ambrose Bierce, Algernon Blackwood, Robert W. Chambers, M. R. James, H. P. Lovecraft, Edgar Allan Poe, W. F. Harvey, Sheridan Le Fanu, E. T. A. Hoffmann, O. Henry, Edith Nesbit, Charles Dickens, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman and A. M. Burrage, among many others!

Don Quixote

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

The Woman in White

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

FRANKENSTEIN or The Modern Prometheus (Uncensored 1818 Edition - Wisehouse Classics)

This is the Uncensored 1818 Edition FRANKENSTEIN; OR, THE MODERN PROMETHEUS, a novel written by the English author Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley about the young science student Victor Frankenstein, who creates a grotesque but sentient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment. Shelley started writing the story when she was eighteen, and the novel was published when she was twenty. The first edition was published anonymously in London in 1818. Shelley's name appears on the second edition, published in France in 1823. Shelley had travelled through Europe in 1814, journeying along the river Rhine in Germany with a stop in Gernsheim which is just 17 km away from Frankenstein Castle, where, two centuries before, an alchemist was engaged in experiments. Later, she travelled in the region of Geneva (Switzerland)-where much of the story takes place-and the topic of galvanism and other similar occult ideas were themes of conversation among her companions, particularly her lover and future husband, Percy Shelley. Mary, Percy, Lord Byron, and John Polidori decided to have a competition to see who could write the best horror story. After thinking for days, Shelley dreamt about a scientist who created life and was horrified by what he had made; her dream later evolved into the novel's story.

Shelley completed her writing in May 1817, and Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus was first published on 11 March 1818 by the small London publishing house of Lackington, Hughes, Harding, Mavor, & Jones. The second edition of Frankenstein was published on 11 August 1822 in two volumes (by G. and W. B. Whittaker) following the success of the stage play Presumption; or, the Fate of Frankenstein by Richard Brinsley Peake; this edition credited Mary Shelley as the author.

On 31 October 1831, the first "popular" edition in one volume appeared, published by Henry Colburn & Richard Bentley. This edition was heavily revised by Mary Shelley, partially because of pressure to make the story more conservative, and included a new, longer preface by her, presenting a somewhat embellished version of the genesis of the story. This edition tends to be the one most widely read now, although editions containing the original 1818 text are still published. Many scholars prefer the 1818 text, arguing that it preserves the spirit of Shelley's original publication.

Actors and the Art of Performance: Under Exposure (Performance Philosophy)

Actors and the Art of Performance: Under Exposure combines the author's two main biographical paths: her professional commitment to the fi elds of both theater and philosophy. The art of acting on stage is analyzed here not only from the theoretical perspective of a spectator but also from the perspective of the actor. The author draws on her experience as both a theater actor and a university professor whose teachings in the art of acting rely heavily on her own experience and also on her philosophical knowledge. The book is unique not only in terms of its content but also in terms of its style. Written in a multiplicity of voices, the text oscillates between philosophical reasoning and narrative forms of writing, including micronarratives, fables, parables, and inter alia by Carroll, Hoff mann, and Kleist. Hence the book claims that a transdisciplinary dialogue between the art of acting and the art of philosophical thinking calls for an aesthetic study that questions and begins to seek alternatives to traditionally established and ingrained formats of philosophy.

Vlad the Impaler: Son of Dracul

Many will assume this is just another retelling of the "Dracula" horror myth... but Vlad's story is true. Hitler's Holocaust killed approximately 10% of Germany's people, while some estimates claim that Vlad exterminated more than 20% of his fellow Wallachians. A gruesome genre-bender with perverse humor, based on 15th-century history. Warning: graphic transgressive violence.

Ten Commandments of YouTube

Want to develop a rabid and devoted fan base on YouTube? Want millions of subscribers? After reaching 1 million subscribers in a year on our YouTube channel, Cartoon Hangover, and spending years studying the best of the best including Hannah Hart, Shay Carl, Michelle Phan and more, the #1 programming team in the world at Frederator Networks has compiled tried and true methods into the most comprehensive YouTube how to guide. This book covers everything from program scheduling and branding, to title and thumbnail design. Follow these 10 commandments and you too can succeed on YouTube. Frederator Loves You.

It's Alive!: The Science of B-Movie Monsters (Chicago Shorts)

The B-movie monster--be it gap-toothed gorilla, ripped-from-time dinosaur, overstretched arachnid, or another outrageous anthropomorphic fantasy--has thrilled moviegoers for decades, and firmly sunk its claws into popular culture. In It's Alive!, Michael LaBarbera delves into the science behind these characters' construction, from the biology surrounding tyrannosaurid postures in Jurassic Park and King Kong to the questionable physics employed by The Incredible Shrinking Man. Accompanied by a treasure trove of images from old movie posters and stills, and ranging from the 1930s to such recent films as The Lord of the Rings trilogy and the latest installments of the Alien franchise, It's Alive! cleverly uses science to remind us that the best parts of moviemaking might indeed be magic-for all creatures, great and small.

Ebert's Bests (Chicago Shorts)

Roger Ebert is a name synonymous with the movies. In Ebert's Bests, he takes readers through the journey of how he became a film critic, from his days at a student-run cinema club to his rise as a television commentator in At the Movies and Siskel & Ebert. Recounting the influence of the French New Wave, his friendships with Werner Herzog and Martin Scorsese, as well as travels to Sweden and Rome to visit Ingrid Bergman and Federico Fellini, Ebert never loses sight of film as a key component of our cultural identity. In considering the ethics of film criticism--why we should take all film seriously, without prejudgment or condescension--he argues that film critics ought always to engage in open-minded dialogue with a movie. Extending this to his accompanying selection of "10 Bests," he reminds us that hearts and minds--and even rankings--are bound to change.

Nixon and the Silver Screen (Chicago Shorts)

Richard Nixon and the film industry arrived in Southern California in the same year, 1913. In Nixon and the Silver Screen, Mark Feeney offers a new and often revelatory way of thinking about one of our most controversial presidents: by looking not just at Nixon's career--but Hollywood's. Nixon viewed more movies while in office than any other president, and Feeney argues that Nixon's story, both in politics and in his personal life, is nothing if not quintessentially American. Bearing in mind the events that shaped his presidency from 1969 to 1974, Feeney sees aspects of Nixon's character--and the nation's--refracted and reimagined in the more than 500 films Nixon watched during his tenure in the White House. The verdict? Nixon's legacy, for better or worse, is forever representative of the "Silver Age" in Hollywood, shaping and being shaped by that flickering silver screen.